Location

“The more often we see the things around us – even the beautiful and wonderful things – the more they become invisible to us. That is why we often take for granted the beauty of this world: because we see things so often, we see them less and less.” – 

I find it intriguing how a different location can change your perspective in a situation.

If I were walking somewhere in my hometown of New Zealand, I would typically be staring at the ground, marching along, only hoping to get to my destination sooner than physically possible. However, being in this new country constantly surrounded by new things, I find myself in tourist mode taking mental photographs of everything; from fence detailing to sky-high buildings.

Today I had a complete day to myself so I decided to venture to see the much anticipated Tower Bridge. However, firstly I wanted to see the Tower bridge from the London Bridge parallel, then head along the Thames Walkway to extend the sightseeing. Along this length of riverside path every person I passed (whom obviously was not a tourist) looked bored. It bewildered me how someone who lives in such a beautiful and iconic place could just look at their phone screens or the ground.

That’s when I remembered Joseph B. Wirthlin’s fantastically accurate quote.

Do we really see so much beauty that we become blind to it?I think as time goes on, especially when you are settled within the same scenery for a length of time, you don’t exactly become blind to it, it just becomes monotonous. There are two ways of looking at this fact, this could be a negative thing; that we become ignorant and ungrateful to this beauty, or perhaps this is a thing to applaud about human psychology.

What would we do if boredom never existed? We would be happy without weariness for sure, but we would never have the motivation to go venture outside of our borders. The world is a beautiful place: full of 196 contrasting countries that are there to be explored. We need boredom to set our ambition dial on full.

With every year from about the age of 15, I became more and more uninterested in my surroundings. Leading into my gap year I found myself getting to the point of just wanting to drive somewhere out of town; for the sake of how bored I was with the same routine of seeing the same things every day. This lack of enthusiasm towards New Zealand was what got me to where I am now. And don’t get me wrong, I will forever appreciate what my parents have given me and my brothers — our home is a beautiful place, possibly the best home I could ever imagine growing up in — but we all eventually become blind to continuous beauty and it is human psychology to always want what we don’t have.

In the weeks leading up to my departure I did become more aware of the beauty in my neighbourhood. When I truly realized and accepted that I was to be leaving everything I had ever known, my love for the views escalated and I saw in more detail how beautiful the Kapiti Coast is; I was and still am so lucky to have been given a home there.

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