Long time, no see.

Hey there. Guess what, I am finally back from a few months of silence.

As you all know, in November last year, I moved to little old New Zealand and have been rather busy with settling into my new life. So, after that eerie period, I’m dusting away those cobwebs to write this piece.

It’s funny how you very quickly settle into a space you know so well. I grew up in New Zealand, in my small town aside the ocean, and to be reunited with it after 4 years came easier than expected. Before I left London, I always got the “it’ll hit you after a while, you’ll miss the hustle of London.” – well, I’m here to tell you, I don’t.

And honestly, I don’t miss it at all. I thought I would; miss the traffic, the busyness, the cafe ridden streets, the atmosphere, but I simply don’t. However, the one thing I do long for, is hangouts with my cosmopolitain friends; the work pals; I met some of the best people in the world in London; I just don’t long for the place itself.

This did come as a surprise to me. I expected myself to struggle with small town living at least for a little while, to regret ‘giving up’ (for better the word) London for a simpler way of life, but I’ve come to realise that New Zealand kinda suits me. I thrive on exercise, and fresh air, and devour outdoor spaces. I’ve caught up with old friends, explored new places, rediscovered my love for cooking and creativity, joined a band; the open space of New Zealand, has allowed me to fill it with more fulfilling activities. There’s something special about this country, and I cannot wait for my London-made friends to come and visit me, so I can show them too.

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It definitely takes leaving a place, to find the appreciation.

It’s cheesy, and the same sentence has probably been said in a million different ways, but it’s true. I left thinking I was too big for the small life, that New Zealand was boring and not good enough for the life I thought I desired. In reality I just didn’t know how to live yet.

I went to London and it was there I learnt how to live. I discovered myself through trials, tribulations, tears and smiles. And that person, this person I became, ended up craving a bigger space to breathe and grow. London suffocated me. It’s definitely a big city, but it’s also hugely populated. I listened to my body, and it was telling me I needed to move on – it’s funny how perfectly, gloriously, accurate your gut instincts can be. Researchers are discovering that microbes in our gut can send messages and important brain chemicals to our brain, affecting how we think, feel, and remember. Well, my theory is that so do your lungs. Breathe the air you should breathe, and you exhale happiness.

I don’t quite know how to explain it, but I just know that New Zealand air is my kind of air. I encourage you to find yours.

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How to stay creative in a world of comparison

I would like to think I am always a supporter of my friends and their endeavours;

I attend events, buy tickets for shows, I purchase the ‘zines, I wander exhibitions, I listen to creations.

First and foremost, I want to thank everyone for the support on my latest project. The love for ‘The Longer My Hair Grows’ exceeded my expectations, and is continuing to do so. There have been nights of teary groove sessions and it’s due to those people who have ordered my book – even as far as asking for signed copies – that has allowed me to taste the dream that I so very much crave.  I feel like a writer now more than I ever have – and this is only the beginning.

However, within the last few days of celebratory excitement, I have noticed those who have said next-to-nothing. Those being friends who are also artists, and whom I thought would respond with overwhelming leaps of love for my achievements – but didn’t.

Which brings me to this blog. So, whilst trying to relieve this blog of any narcissistic undertones, let’s chat.

How do I deal with competition or fellow creatives who aren’t so happy about my achievements? Well, I just don’t give two shits.

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I live my ‘writer’s life’ in a very, I guess you could say, realistic manner.         Par example:

“I will publish a novel, but I don’t expect it to be my only income.”

“I will – one day – go on a book tour, but that may not include America.”

“I will gain more followers for the work I write on social media, but I will never rock the world.”

I keep myself on the ground, because I know to be successful requires hard work and self-belief, and not fairy-tale destiny crap. You have to start somewhere; the more you focus on your craft, the more authentic and original your work will be – ultimately, that is what is going to invite fandom. Yes, I sometimes fall into the trap of looking at other’s published books only to tell myself I’ll never be that good, but I don’t stay in that mindset very long. I remind myself that comparison won’t make me a better writer, writing will. So, I write. 

“If I waited for perfection, I would never write a word.”

 Margaret Atwood

Stay focused on what you’re doing whilst supporting others. And remember, you most definitely will never get better if your ideal of perfection changes with person to person. I think the only competition there should be when it comes to creating is with yourself; with your previous work, and the need to hone in on the skill.

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Instead of comparing yourself to another artist, ask them for critique.

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My debut collection of poems, ‘The Longer My Hair Grows’, available now. Click here. 

 

 

 

 

Three Ways To Get Enthusiastic About Work

It’s something we all struggle with at some point – a lack of enthusiasm to work the ‘nine to five’. Doesn’t matter how much we love the job, sometimes the happy vibes are nowhere to be found.

So that brings us to today’s blog, three ways to get enthusiastic about work.


1. | Why do you work?

This may seem like a silly question, but think about it for a second. Why do you work where you do?  Does it allow you to live a certain way in a particular area? Does it pay well? Is it your passion? (If it is, not sure why you’d be reading this, but whatever) OR do you work because it allows you to live out your passion when you’re not working?

More often than not, when you’re in your early twenties – like me – where you’re working isn’t usually your dream job, but you’re doing it to support something else. I work, to allow myself to live in London which in turn gives me opportunities to further my writing career.

So, figure out the reason why you’re doing what you’re doing, and remind yourself of it every time you have to clock into a shift.

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2. | Make the most of your free time

Other than seeing work as a means to an end, another way we can find enthusiasm to work is by not living and breathing the work place. Ever have a week where it feels like all you’ve done is eat, sleep, and work? Yeah, well me too. And it sucks! We all want to feel like we have life outside of work rotas and uniforms.

So piece of advice numéro deux? MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR FREE TIME. Book those events you want to attend, go for that audition, or simply… leave the damned house! Even if it means you go sit in a café and sip on a soya latte whilst reading a magazine, do it! Or if you work the ‘nine to five’, drop the whole “I’m tired act” and invite your friends over for a bottle of wine; go to the cinema. Make sure you’re spending your money on things other than the commute to work, and the bills. We earn money to live, not to follow the same old routine day in and day out. Spend your free time, fulfilling your passons; do what you love!

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3. | ‘Be the energy you want to attract’

We have to work, that’s the reality of it. I’m not here to tell you how to get out of working, because if you want to lead an exciting life, chances are you’ll need money for it. HOWEVER, HOW you work is a whole other ball game. I read a quote the other week which literally changed my perspective on work attitude like that *insert finger snap*.

“Be the energy you want to attract”.

My third and final way to get enthusiastic about work is to look at energy with a different perspective. Depending on where you work you have no idea who you’re serving, or working with.

Imagine this, you could be an aspiring actor, and one day you’re chatting up a storm to this guy, and you’re all passionate and excitable, then turns out hes a director at the National Theatre and ba-da-bing, you have a foot in the door. Conquer from within, and be the energy you want to attract. See work as another platform to further yourself, because it will be if you say it is.

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Screenshot the quotes, save them as your screen savers or lock screens; remind yourself of them everyday.

Only you stand in your way.

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